Sex chat with teens


It is important, therefore, to start the conversation early, and to make it clear to your children that you are always willing to talk about sexuality – whenever questions come up for them, or when a "teachable moment" occurs. Sexuality, in most of its aspects, can be a joyful topic for discussion in the family.Remember to keep your sense of humor throughout conversations with your child – the conversation doesn't have to be tense and uncomfortable unless you make it that way.Correct misinformation gently, and reinforce your values whenever possible. Too often, parents think they need to wait until they collect enough information and energy to be prepared to have "THE TALK" with their children.However, sexuality is a part of every person's life from the moment he or she is born.Back to top Some parents believe that talking about sex will lead to teens having sex.In fact, research shows that teens who have talked with their parents about sex are more likely to post-pone sex and use birth control when they do begin.Talking about sexuality with your children can be a challenge.



Even with the support of these external resources, it is important to remember: parents are the most important sexuality educators for their children.Whatever your relationship to religion, it's important that you talk with your child about sexuality in the context of your own personal, moral views.On this page you will find some things you should know – such as tips and advice – that you should consider when opening a conversation with your teen about sex and sexuality.Some parents feel they don't know enough to be a reliable source of accurate information.

Additionally, when teens feel uncomfortable coming to their parents or guardians regarding difficult issues, such as sex, they often turn to their friends and/or the media in order to gain information.

Often, the information that your teen receives from these sources are either blatantly wrong or misinformed.